Asian Studies Program

Chinese Australia

Using Lessons


Find out more about using the lessons on the Chinese Heritage of Australian Federation website by scrolling down the page or clicking on the points below:
- What's in the lessons?
- Do I have to teach the lessons on line?
- What about copyright?
- How do I use the links in the lesson?
- I keep getting lost on the website. What can I do?
- I'm new to the web and need some help.

What's in the lessons?
Each of the lessons on this website provides information about the following:
- year level the lesson is pitched at
- key learning areas drawn on
- Studies in Asia curriculum emphases covered
- approximate duration of the lesson
- brief description of the lesson
- teacher background material which introduces and provides an overview to topics in the lesson
- outcomes of the lesson for students
- material required to teach the lesson
- description of teaching proceedure and often extension exercises
- accompanying handouts (where appropriate)
- acknowledgement of references and websites drawn on in the lesson

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Do I have to teach the lessons on line?
While it is expected that teachers will initially draw on lesson plans via the website. It is possible for all lessons to be taught:
- on-line using one computer and a datashow or a computer lap,
- using a cached system or
- through printed or overhead copies of online material.

Important note: Teachers should make sure they are familiar with Australian copyright law before copying and distributing material which is under copyright. The Australian Copyright Council provides information about such matters. Information produced by the Chinese Heritage of Australian Federation project is made freely available for teaching and research purposes.

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What about copyright?
Teachers should make sure they are familiar with Australian copyright law before copying and distributing material which is under copyright. The Australian Copyright Council provides information about such matters. Information produced by the Chinese Heritage of Australian Federation project is made freely available for teaching and research purposes.

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How do I use the links in the lesson?
The web is a very versitile tool that allows us to draw material from selected webpages, particular parts of web pages and entries in databases on the web. Often this leads to very cumbersome web addresses that are distracting to view within a lesson and difficult to retype without error.

What we have therefore done is to provide links that 'hide' behind the title of the particular item that the link takes you to. Clicking on the link will take you directly to the page required for the lesson. If necessary you can copy the web address from the page from here.

Each link will also be accompanied by the name of the website the link will take you to. By scrolling down to the heading 'Summary of websites used in this lesson' at the bottom of the lesson you will find the web address of the main website. If necessary you can go to the main website and then search for the particular item required using that webpage's search mechanisms.

Example of how links will look in the lessons:
- Background on 'Cheok Hong Cheong' on the Chinese Heritage of Australian Federation website.
- Document 1238: 'Australian Chinese petition to the British Government' on the Chinese Heritage of Australian Federation website
- Richard Sliwa's fan website of John Williams
- 'R.G. Menzies' article part of 'Famous Australians' on the ABC Online website.
- Entry on 'Confucius' by Wu-Chi Liu, Ph.D. on the MSN Encarta website.
- Entry on 'Confucius' on Biography.com website.
- Biographies of 'Quong Tart' and 'Dr. Sun Yat Sen' on the Harvest of Endurance Scroll website.

The 'Summary of websites for this lesson' heading for the above links would be:

Chinese Heritage of Australian Federation website - http
- Background information - education/about.htm
- Digital historic documents - docs_home.htm

'Harvest of Endurance Scroll' on the National Museum of Australia website - http://www.nma.gov.au/harvest/html/

Fan website of John Williams - http://plum.cream.org/williams/index.htm

'Famous Australians' on the ABC Online website - http://www.abc.net.au/btn/austs.htm

MSN Encarta website - http://encarta.msn.com

Biography.com website - http://biography.com

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I keep getting lost on the website. What can I do?
The best way to avoid getting lost on the web is to use the 'back' button on your web browser. This button will take you to the last webpage you viewed and can be used multiple times until you return to the place you want to be on.

Alternatively you can 'bookmark' pages you want to refer back to regularly, such as particular lessons.

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I'm new to the web and need some help.
Why not work your way through AsiaEdNet's tutorial This tutorial will guide you through generally using the web and more specifically about using online materials in the classroom. To get to the tutorial click on the highlighted text or go to the following web address: http://www.curriculum.edu.au/accessasia/network/tutorial

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